diy: cutting board recipe holder

diy: cutting board recipe holder I first saw this idea forever ago on Pinterest as a DIY version of a Pottery Barn item. I've had it tucked away in my mind ever since, just waiting for the perfect paddle cutting board to come around at a thrift store. I finally found one and I'm so happy with how this turned out. This rustic recipe holder will be something I use for years to come! It can be used for books, tablets, or even just printed recipes. This would also make a great gift for the chef in your life, or as a unique housewarming gift.

what you need: paddle cutting board, scrabble tile holder, wooden wedge, piece of leather + stamps
diy: cutting board recipe holderdiy: cutting board recipe holder Start with a clean paddle cutting board. Using wood glue, adhere a Scrabble tile holder to the front. Note: you may need to cut or file your tile holder down to the same width as your cutting board so it doesn't hang over. Again using wood glue, adhere a wooden triangular block to the back. This will act as a wedge that holds your cutting board up, so it should be pretty thick and heavy.
diy: cutting board recipe holderdiy: cutting board recipe holder After the glue has completely dried, paint everything entirely. I did an undercoat of yellow (hard to tell in photos) and a top coat of ivory, then sanded it down for a rustic look. Once your paint has dried, add your final touches. I added a tied strip of leather and stamped 'bon appetit' to the top. Voila!
diy: cutting board recipe holder

thrifting: the bad & the ugly // vol. 6

thrifting: the bad & the ugly
If you're going to tell her how ugly she is, she doesn't want to hear it.

thrifting: the bad & the ugly
Collectibles? More like a crime scene.

thrifting: the bad & the ugly
Jesus Christ that fish is ugly.

thrifting: the bad & the ugly
Well, apparently this friend could imagine life without this mug.

thrifting: the bad & the ugly
An enormous wicker baby bootie, every house should have one.

photo (1)
Classy maternity wear.

photo (2)
Everything about this is "weird"

diy: budget scrapbooking

diy: budget scrapbooking Scrapbooking is like exercising; you tell yourself you're going to do it and you prep for it and buy what you need, but when it comes time you decide you're not up for it. Recently I discovered Project Life and it makes tackling a scrapbook so much easier. You can buy sleeved pages that make layouts a breeze, and then you just fill it in with your own touches and memorabilia.

The problem is, Project Life is pricey (and you aren't going to find this stuff at thrift stores). You can't really get around buying the album and pages, but other than that I've found ways to keep it fairly cheap.

Sizing photos: use Gimp (it's free)! The pockets for Project Life are 4x6 (standard) and 4x3. To create the 4x3 images, use the collage setting and choose the first Biggie Smalls template (1 large and 2 small squares). Resize it to 1800 x 1200 (you may need to press the lock fist to allow you to do this), then just "x" out one of the small squares so you're left with two of the same size. Choose the photos you want and save the image. Then, just print it as a 4x6 image and cut down the line. So easy!
diy: budget scrapbooking

Printing photos: shop around before you print. I was able to print off of Shutterfly for 1/3 of the price (including some enlargements) of CVS and Target. Look for discount codes, new member promotions, etc. I thought about printing them from home, but the price of ink would have been more than I spent on Shutterfly. I invested in a corner-rounder and round the corners on my own photos and paper. diy: budget scrapbookingdiy: budget scrapbooking

Paper: rather than buying overpriced pre-packaged papers, use your own paper trimmed down to size. Have fun creating your own page designs with notes, stamps, stickers, etc. diy: budget scrapbookingdiy: budget scrapbooking

Don't fall for the advertising gimmicks: lots of stores advertise 'scrapbooking pens', 'scrapbooking paper', or 'scrapbooking glue'. Just because it has a certain label on it doesn't make it better in any way. They're just simple materials...use the stuff you already have at home! diy: budget scrapbookingdiy: budget scrapbookingdiy: budget scrapbooking

Memorabilia: use all of your saved ticket-stubs, pamphlets, maps, etc from all the places you visit. Incorporate these into your pages to fill your book. You can even use these as notecards to write the date or any fun memories from the visit. This is a great way to fill up your book and remember all the things you saw.
diy: budget scrapbookingdiy: budget scrapbookingdiy: budget scrapbooking

Keep it simple: the scrapbook should showcase your memories, not a bunch of stickers and nonsense. Keep the focus on your photos. A little pizzazz goes a long way when it comes to looking at a scrapbook page (when in doubt, leave it out!). Flipping through your book should remind you of where you've been, not induce a seizure.
diy: budget scrapbookingdiy: budget scrapbooking diy: budget scrapbooking